THE PRICE OF AIRBRUSHING REALITY

Files under General | Feb 1st

 

The Mail Online reports:

“The Advertising Standards Authority is banning the advert, ruling that the image of Miss Weisz, pictured, ‘misleadingly exaggerated’ the performance of the product. Last year L’Oreal adverts featuring Julia Roberts and Christy Turlington were also banned for being misleading.”

My take: airbrushing reality is rocketing not just in advertising but in photojournalism. So readers and consumers become more and more skeptical about ads and news pictures because we trade reality for aesthetics: when only beauty matters, truth and credibility die.


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AP’S TOM CURLEY: MORE NEWS THAN EVER

Files under General | Jan 31st

Tom Curley, retiring Associated Press CEO in a recent interview:

“The market for news traditionally defined is growing, it’s stronger than ever, there are more people engaged with news more times a day and in more countries than ever before. The overall market is strong. The challenge is the revenue side and how to raise revenues. There’s obviously a shifting taking place. Some of that shift has involved sending money from traditional media to web players so we all have to figure out what relevance means for the news world.”

My take: news-wire services like Associated Press are excellent platforms to learn how to integrate multimedia newsrooms, and some of the best places to produce high quality news and analytic reliable content.


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FORMER COSMO EDITOR $30 MILLION DONATION TO COLUMBIA AND STANFORD FOR A MEDIA INNOVATION CENTER

Files under General | Jan 31st

Great news:

Helen Gurley Brown, who edited Cosmopolitan for 31 years, gave $30 million on behalf of her late husband David, a movie and musical producer who attended Columbia and Stanford universities.

Helen Gurley Brown, will be 90 in February, and was editor of Cosmopolitan from 1965 to 1996,  a magazine with 64 editions, in 35 languages and more than 80 countries.

David Brown, along with Richard Zanuck and Steven Spielberg produced such classic American films as “Driving Miss Daisy,” “The Verdict” and “Jaws”

My take: The “David and Helen Gurley Brown Institute for Media Innovation” is a fantastic idea. Stanford will bring the technology and Columbia the media tradition. In the past, a media school will have joint a business school in this kind of programs, but now, more and more, technology is the new media business model.

 

(David and Helen Gurley Brown in 1984. Photo/Hearst.)


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LA TRIBUNE: LIPSTICK-ON-A-PIG

Files under General | Jan 30th

The death of LA TRIBUNE in Paris shows that full color, size or design will not solve the problems of newspapers.

LA TRIBUNE is firing two thirds of a very small newsroom with 77 journalists, and now wants to become a printed weekly plus a daily news website, all done with less than 30 journalists.

Good luck!

More and more, bad newspapers with bad managers, no advertising and a few readers, are becoming “digital papers”… when, in reality, they were dead on print like they will be dead online.

Newspaper need more than cosmetic solutions.

You cannot change a paper just adding more color, more graphics or playing with the format.

Newspapers need more and better Journalism, more and better journalists, and more and better managers, on print and on line.

Nor less.

If not, any solution is just putting lipstick-on-a-pig.

That’s all folks!

 

 


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INTEGRATED MULTIMEDIA NEWSROOMS ROCK

Files under General | Jan 28th

INNOVATION is right now working with our Media Architects of Calau&Riera in Barcelona and our international network of Newsroom Management Consultants in almost a dozen of new integrated multimedia newsrooms, in United States, Latin America, Europe, and Middle East.

Watch here a short video clip with the key-elements of these “information-engine” and “digital first” multimedia newsrooms.

(In the picture, the Russian Ria Novosti super desk in Moscu)


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THE PROBLEM OF NEWSPAPERS AS NEWS MORGUES

Files under General | Jan 28th

Let’s face it.

Many newspapers look today like a daily morgue.

A compilation of dead news bodies.

Well presented, but dead.

And our newsrooms spend time and time just to collect, embellish and organise the daily morgue.

Yes, we do some forensic journalism too, but it’s too little, to late.

Instant analysis is done more and more by websites, blogs and wire services.

So, what’s the role of a daily newspaper?

Not to be a news morgue.

Not to be forensic media

But “Prognosis Media.”

Diagnostics are not needed in newspapers after dead news are in front of us.

Again, it’s to late.

What our readers need and want in print or in tablets is “Slow Cooking Journalism.”

Not just telling us what we already know, but “Forward Journalism.”

Print and tablet news journalists are needed to advise and prevent.

Welcome to the “Strategic Journalism” preached in the 1980′s by pioneers like Claude Monnier.

Welcome to INNOVATION’s “Caviar Journalism.”

 

 


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BLOOMBER PURSUITS, THE NEW MAGAZINE JUST FOR THE 1%

Files under General | Jan 27th

Bloomberg Pursuits wants to be the “first global luxury magazine”

It will be a complimentary magazine targeting the 310.000 subscribers of the $20,000 a year Bloomberg Terminals.

The average household income of Bloomberg Pursuits readers is $452,000, and 90 percent are male.

The debut issue contains 46 editorial pages and 30 advertising pages.

The new magazine will start next month as a quarterly.

My take: small pagination for a wealthy magazine in a crowded market. A new brand for the Bloomberg magazine portfolio where only Businessweek rocks. Free for rich? No way.

(Pictures: an early prototype of the magazine’s cover and two real double-spread of the first issue)


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THE NEW BROADCASTING HOUSE: ONE OF WORLD’S LARGEST MULTIMEDIA NEWSROOMS

Files under General | Jan 27th

A few pictures from Rory Cellan-Jones about the construction of the new BBC headquarters in the old Regent Street headquarters.

This will be one the world’s  largest multimedia newsroom (up to 6,000 people in total and up to 320 journalists in the newsroom).

I saw the plans last year during our meetings with the BBC journalism editors, and the real thing looks better.

This mega-newsroom will be fully operational in 2013.

The dramatic BBC newsroom will be visible both from the street and through a large glass window in a BBC Media Cafe open to the public.

In this picture you can see the INNOVATION “solar system” idea under construction

And here you can have a full view of the central desk

Read here more about the current work in Broadcasting House.

 

 


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JOHNSTON PRESS: A HEALTHY MARGIN OVER 20%

Files under General | Jan 27th

An interesting and revealing interview with the young and visionary CEO of Johnston Press:

“The fundamental aspect of the business is that every newspaper in the group has a healthy margin over 20 per cent and all up the business is very profitable. The challenge is, can you migrate that business into the digital realm quickly enough before profits decline.”

My take: Many leading newspaper companies are still very profitable, and investing in the digital future, because there is no other one and no other one strategy: investing the money of the past in the business of the future.


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PAY OR NOT PAY, READ OR NOT TO READ

Files under General | Jan 26th

Nathan Myhrvold, former chief strategist and chief technology officer at Microsoft, founder of Intellectual Ventures, writes in Bloomberg View:

“Could newspaper journalism likewise entice readers to pay for online news? People like quality journalism, so I believe that, ultimately, they can be persuaded to pay for it. But as with cable, the price will have to start low; it can then inch upward as the public gradually accepts the new business model.

The question is whether paid-subscription news sites can make the transition fast enough to make up for their plummeting ad revenue. It takes time to persuade people to pay for something they expect to get free. Ultimately, the change will happen, but maybe not fast enough to save some of the great institutions of newspaper journalism.”

My take: Yes, many great institutions of newspaper journalism will not make it, but Journalism will survive. So, great is good, but fast is better.

 


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