MALOFIEJ AWARDS: THE WORLD’S BEST INFOGRAPHICS

Files under General | Mar 31st

The 2007 “Pulitzers for infographics” are here.

And for the first time in its 15 year history, the Malofiej International Infographic Awards has presented the Peter Sullivan Prize exclusively to an online entry: The New York Times wins for its interactive feature Sector Snapshot, which analyzes daily behavior by sector of the companies in the major stock indexes.

Other Gold winners were Clarin (Argentina), Expresso (Portugal), San Jose Mercury News (U.S.), The Oregonian, (U.S.), Dagens Nyheter (Sweden), The Guardian (UK), Welt am Sonntag (Germany), Mundo Estranho (Brazil) and National Geographic (U.S.).

More details here.

Peter Sullivan worked at The Sunday Times for many years with no computers, but he was a great graphic storyteller.

Today, he would be more than happy to use all these new multimedia tools.

Something that traditional graphic journalists must do.



DIGITAL VERSIONS OF PRINT ICONS

Files under General | Mar 31st

Juan Senor, our UK Director, reports:

Here’s a superb example from The Economist on how to turn a one dimensional, paper-only brand into a digital multimedia icon.

The legendary Kal has been doing these political cartoons for 28 years for The Economist.

And beginning this month he is adding sound and video to them.

It’s already circulating on YouTube!

Also watch here a fascinating piece on how political cartoons – something which are a powerful domain of newspapers because only they can do it really well – are moving into the digital 21st century.

This has been our domain, one of the defining elements of newspapers.

Let’s embrace these new multimedia models so we don’t lose them to other media.



MORE ABOUT THE FUTURE OF NEWSPAPERS

Files under General | Mar 30th

Jeff Jarvis covers a recent breakfast in New York about the future of newspapers with Gary Pruitt, the CEO of McClatchy, and Dean Baquet, the former Los Angeles Times editor and now Washington D.C. bureau chief for The New York Times.

Yes, they are right.

The industry is too pesimistic.

There are too many fears.

Too much panic.

And some common sense is urgently needed.

Common sense and, my dear, a lot of change and innovation.

Gary Pruitt still is reluctant to accept the role of the Internet.

And this is not good for a company that now owns one of the first online news services in the world, nando.net.

I remember my first trip with Vince Giuliano to North Carolina to meet with them.

It was a fascinating operation.

Like the mercurynews project.

Now these two papers belong to the same company but this new CEO still has doubts…

Well, as Jeff says, if I had McClatchy stock perhaps the best reaction to these myopic statements would be to sell it as soon as possible.



THE CITIZENS’ AGENDA

Files under General | Mar 29th

This week in Television Española (TVE), the state-owned TV channel, the Prime Minister and leader of the Socialist Party, Mr. Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, confronted questions from 100 regular citizens for two hours.

One of them asked Mr. Zapatero: Do you know how much a cup of coffee costs?

The politician’s face was frozen and then he said: 0.80 euros ($1.05)

Well, all Mr. Zapatero needs to do is walk into any Starbucks or similar place to know that he could pay two or three times that!

EL PAIS put the question and the anwser on a big headline on the front page.

But more important that this lack of knowledge, were the topics of 90% of the questions.

Housing.

Education.

Inmigration.

Jobs.

Courts.

Salaries.

Poverty…

A citizens agenda that it is very different than the usual policitian’s agenda and the media agenda.

The big surprise of this program was how five million spectators watched the Prime Minister unable to respond to many of these real issues with sincere and genuine words.

Instead he presented numbers, generic concepts, slogans and no real anwsers.

Another reason to cover elections not from the point of view of the candidates, but from the point of view of the voters.

Politicians, like many editors, need to talk more with real people.

They are the ones that buy and read (or not) our newspapers.



PHIL BRONSTEIN, AN EDITOR WHO HAS TO GO

Files under General | Mar 29th

Tim O’Reilly says:

I’m hearing rumors that the San Francisco Chronicle is in big trouble.

Apparently, Phil Bronstein, the editor-in-chief, told staff in a recent “emergency meeting” that the news business “is broken, and no one knows how to fix it.” (“And if any other paper says they do, they’re lying.”)

Reportedly, the paper plans to announce more layoffs before the year is out.

Well, if an editor says that, he has to go.

Period.



OLD NEWSWEEK BEATS NEW TIME

Files under General | Mar 28th

What a difference!

The new TIME magazine changed its cover story in the U.S. about the new Taliban that was in all the international editions, while NEWSEEK devoted almost all of its U.S. edition to the last words of many casualties of the war.

VOICES OF THE FALLEN is a terrific special issue that includes letters, email messages and SMS like this one:

The text-message exchange below is between Evey (jaseevey) and his father (johnevey). johnevey (2:33:44 PM): Are you going to get some dinner?
johnevey
(2:33:52 PM): Mom mentioned that you weren’t sure that you would.
jaseevey
(2:34:06 PM): I dunno, not really interested tonight
jaseevey
(2:34:14 PM): have to put on full gear to go and eat
johnevey
(2:34:15 PM): Are your missions going ok?
johnevey
(2:34:26 PM): Wow, just to eat.
jaseevey
(2:34:33 PM): yeah
jaseevey
(2:34:38 PM): missions have been fine
johnevey
(2:34:39 PM): Is that because of the need to be ready or the potential for shelling?
jaseevey
(2:34:55 PM): had a big IED the other night…but we found it
johnevey
(2:35:02 PM): Or are you just in a danger zone getting to the mess hall?
jaseevey
(2:35:12 PM): it was in some grass and there was wire poking out
johnevey
(2:35:14 PM): Found the IED on the mission?
johnevey
(2:35:24 PM): Found before it exploded?
jaseevey
(2:35:29 PM): yeah, we usually find one
jaseevey
(2:35:33 PM): yes
johnevey
(2:35:43 PM): Along a roadway?
johnevey
(2:36:06 PM): Are they detonated by contact or by some kind of remote signal?
jaseevey
(2:36:49 PM): yeah…cell phone, RC car control…you name it
jaseevey
(2:36:56 PM): garage door openers
jaseevey
(2:37:06 PM): security key fobs for car doors
jaseevey
(2:37:19 PM): they arent new to this
johnevey
(2:37:24 PM): So someone is watching and hoping that troops get close enough for it to do some damage.
jaseevey
(2:37:28 PM): yep
johnevey
(2:37:50 PM): Sounds harrowing.
jaseevey
(2:37:57 PM): it can be
johnevey
(2:38:00 PM): How do you find them.
jaseevey
(2:38:07 PM): drive slow
jaseevey
(2:38:17 PM): stay alert of anything odd
johnevey
(2:38:32 PM): So your job is to keep the road open for traffic?
jaseevey
(2:38:39 PM): most of the time
johnevey
(2:38:48 PM): What do you do when you find them–detonate them>?
jaseevey
(2:39:12 PM): pretty much

Evey, 29, of Stockton, Calif., was killed on July 16, 2006, when his Bradley Fighting Vehicle was hit by an IED during combat operations in Baghdad.



UK: ONLINE ADVERTISING SHARE OVERTAKES NEWSPAPERS

Files under General | Mar 28th

Katie Allen reports in The Guardian a dramatic change in the UK advertising media spending: Advertising spending online overtook national newspapers’ share of the pie for the first time in 2006.

According to data from the Internet Advertising Bureau out today, online spending smashed through the £2bn barrier in 2006 while television revenues fell and press barely budged.

A 41% leap put 2006 UK online spending at £2.016bn, representing 11.4% of total advertising revenues.

IAB said that helped offset declines in traditional media and meant the overall advertising industry was able to clock up modest growth of 1.1% over the year.

The report highlights Britain’s world-leading position, even compared with America.

The global average proportion of advertising spending online is 5.8%. The US figure is about 7-7.5%.

As advertisers rushed online to target Britain’s 31 million web users, their spending countered a 4.7% fall in the TV advertising market.

There was a barely discernible 0.2% rise at national newspapers.

At £1.9bn – or 10.9% of the total market – press advertising was behind the internet for the first time, in line with IAB’s predictions last year.

Spending on search advertising jumped 52% to £1.2bn, giving it a 57.8% share of the online market.

Online classified advertising made up 18.8% and experienced growth of 45%, in stark contrast to traditional press where classified advertising fell 7.8%.

But interruptive formats, including pop-ups, have been falling.

They are now worth 0.7% of all online spending as advertisers continue to drop formats that mirror the old-fashioned interruptive nature of TV and radio advertising.

In numbers

The UK spends a bigger share of ad money online than anywhere else, even the US. In 2006 the share was 11.4%

UK online advertising in 2006 was worth £2.061bn

The growth in online ad spending in 2006 was 41%

The national newspapers’ share of advertising spending last year was 10.9%



NEWSPAPERS AND MAGAZINES ALMOST FREE (2): NEW YORK OBSERVER

Files under General | Mar 27th

new_york_observer.jpg

Another “paid” paper that you can get very cheap.

The New York Observer weekly.

Regular cover price: $1.00

Offer: one year (49 issues) for only $15.00

That means $0.30 per issue.

I am sure it will cost them more than $15.00 to send me this “paid” paper 49 times a year.



MONOCLE 02

Files under General | Mar 26th

I got the April issue of Monocle today in New York.

The magazine was still in boxes.

The news agent asked me the same question: What is this a magazine about?

World affairs, I said.

He went to the back of store and found the box.

I got two copies.

I had lunch with Andres Mata, the editor of El Universal in Caracas, and one of the copies went to him.

He didn’t know about the magazine.

Monocle is still an underground publication.

Let’s see what we have here:

It has better cover paper.

Less pages (194 plus the 32 pages of the KitaKoga comic booklet) but the same quality content.

Norway as a geopolitical cover story.

Pages 2 and 3 for a Rolex ad.

Cosmopolitan reports from more than 16 places: Norway, Samara, Barcelona, Bremen, Quito, Abu Dhabi, Copenhagen, Delhi, Mumbai, Tokyo, Istanbul, Paris, Basel, Mexico City, Los Angeles, Derbyshire, Trieste, Graz, Punta Plata, Lima, Cairo, Alexandria, Mogadishu…

And on the last page, Tyler Brule advocating for a London Media City.

Again, a compelling “briefing on global affairs, business, culture and design.”

I am flying tonight to Europe.

This will be my flight food.

UPDATE (after my first readings)
Some of the photos are really bad.

This is an area with a lot of room for improvement.

An interview with a Catalan politician (very bad, with no context and no editing) has a few shots that look like pictures taken with a cellular phone …

If this piece is part of the price to have some Catalan investors, Tyler Brule has to be careful.

And the same happens with some bits about the aviation industry, where Tyler Brule had previous business.

Credibility is the key for the success of any media publication.

Monocle can be dead in just months if readers and advertisers have this perception.



NEWSPAPERS AND MAGAZINES ALMOST FREE (1): THE WALL STREET JOUNAL

Files under General | Mar 26th

528px-wall_street_journal.jpg

Paid newspapers?

Wait a minute!

If I buy a single copy, The Wall Street Journal will cost me $1 ($1.50 on weekends).

But if I subscribe for home delivery for 52 weeks ($430.00), it will only cost me $99.

I will save $331.50

And this includes the print and online editions.

I got this offer in the mail today.

And my question: is The Wall Street Journal a paid paper?